Alan Cumming and Nicola Sturgeon on Question Time

There will be two voices for an independent Scotland on BBC Question Time this week, with Alan Cumming and Nicola Sturgeon now confirmed as guests on the programme.

The show will take place in Inverness on Thursday and will be broadcast on BBC 1 at 10.35pm. Other guests include former Lib Dem leader Charles Kennedy, Conservative peer Lord Forsyth and Labour leader Johann Lamont MSP.

Alan Cumming was one of the key speakers at the launch of Yes Scotland, where he spoke of campaigning for a Yes, Yes vote for devolution in 1997 and also of Scotland's spirit and creative energy, and the opportunities of becoming independent:

“Since devolution Scotland has blossomed not just as a cultural force on the world’s stage but in terms of the confidence and pride the Scottish people have come to enjoy. As I've traveled the world I have seen the change in the way that Scotland is perceived and the way it presents itself to the world. Independence can only add to our potential and release a new wave of creativity and ambition. The world is waiting for us and I know that we are ready.”

If you agree with Alan, show your support by signing the Yes Declaration here.

Topics: 
Citizenship, Government

Should Scotland be an independent country?

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